Dual Citizenship


I noticed you tweeted that you love St. George. You probably have no idea that is where I was born, do you?

Actually, I can answer my own question: You don’t have a clue I was born in St. George. You don’t know that my birthday is coming up in two weeks, either. Nor do you know that you and I were born at almost the exact same time of day.

I wonder…why do you love St. George? Is your unknowing heart tuned to the same desert song as mine? Does the heat of the sun reflected on the red rocks press into your pores, warming you through as it sways your unknowing heart towards your roots?

And then I wonder…will it ever matter to you? I know you are young, oh so young, and I know I must be patient, oh so patient, but this mother longs to tell you: You are a daughter of the high desert and of the ocean waves.

 

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10 thoughts on “Dual Citizenship

  1. Ah, all I can say with this post is it brought the tears to my eyes.

    I’m so sorry for all you and your daughter must go through in the name of adoption!

    • Thanks, Cassi. My sister-in-law had cancer a few years back and so we all got “Cancer Sucks” paraphernalia to proclaim our profound dislike for the disease. I think I need an “Adoption Sucks” t-shirt. What do you think?

      M.

    • It is pretty darn cool, isn’t it? I wonder if she knows I follow her…would you be totally creeped out to know your first mom (or one of your siblings) was following you on twitter?

      M.

      • Not that they ever would (not speaking English and all ;P), but if that happened, I’d go nuts. But that’s just me.

        As it is, I Friended them on Facebook, although they’re still very much into Wretch, and one of my siblings isn’t even really “active” in social networking.

      • Like go nuts in a good way, or a oh-my-stinkinheck-that’s-creepy-as-all-get-out kind of way?

        And I have been thinking a lot about you and your story over the past couple of days…should my daughter ever want to know more about her roots, she is going to discover a similar situation with her extended family on her natural father’s side. They all speak Samoan and live in Samoa which is a long, long, loooooong way away from where she grew up. While they do have some English, it isn’t their native language and I can only imagine it will be difficult for her to communicate with them.

        *sigh* (I seem to do a lot of that lately). Adoption really is the gift that keeps on giving, isn’t it?

  2. “Is your unknowing heart tuned to the same desert song as mine? Does the heat of the sun reflected on the red rocks press into your pores, warming you through as it sways your unknowing heart towards your roots?”

    I choose to believe that the answer to these questions is “yes!”.

    Also, yes ~ it will matter to her and yes, you will one day be able to tell her she is the daughter of the desert and the ocean.

    You have such a way with words, your writing is beautiful.

    Susie

    • Thanks, Susie. I inherited the writing thing from my mama. In fact, compared to my mom, I write like a 3rd grader.

      I certainly hope I get to tell my daughter all these things in person some day…I worry though that she may never overcome the ties that bind her to the place she is now.

      M.

  3. “Like go nuts in a good way”

    Yep.

    But then again, I follow them on Wretch (and exceedingly on Facebook) much more often than they realize, which is a good thing, because they’d probably think it was weird if they knew just how frequently I view their photos and junk.

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