Sign on The Dotted Line


Dear Ms. Feverfew –

We recently moved and needed to buy a refrigerator for our new digs. We found one for a fraction of the price (last year’s model + floor model = cheap cheap cheap), laid down the dinero and went along our merry way. It will be delivered tomorrow and makes me feel utterly old. Only grown ups buy large appliances and I am not that old, am I??? At any rate, it is stainless steel w/french doors and two lower freezer drawers. It has an in-door ice maker & water dispenser so the boys can get their own ice water. (Er… so the BOY can get his own – the 14 year old is pretty adept, the 6 year old…we are still working on him).

Last night, I was looking over the paper work from the store and came across this statement, in bold all caps:

CUSTOMER MAY CANCEL THIS AGREEMENT WITHOUT PENALTY OR OBLIGATION BY DELIVERING WRITTEN NOTICE TO THE HOME DEPOT BY MIDNIGHT ON THE THIRD BUSINESS DAY AFTER SIGNING THIS AGREEMENT.

I laughed out loud. Three business days to rethink an appliance purchase but NO grace period to rethink an adoption relinquishment in a state like Utah? Does anyone else see the irony in that?

And did you catch that a person has three business days, not calendar days, in which to change their mind? So that means if I had purchased this on a Friday evening and the next Monday was a federal holiday, I would have until midnight the following Thursday to change my mind. Just for kicks contrast that with adoption laws in Utah: Once my pen left that paper, my decision was irrevocable.

Snort.

Three days to change a mind about a fridge but NO grace period in which to live with the reality of adoption before making a legally binding and irrevocable decision. Now that’s what I call high comedy.

Or something like it.

Much love,

M.

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5 thoughts on “Sign on The Dotted Line

  1. You are not really honest, in the Utah adoption industry the adopter is the customer. Mothers are just a natural resource to be mined.

  2. Ah, but Teddy, that is how *infant* adoption is every where not just Utah. One need only look at the pricing lists for “situations” on various adoption agency websites to uncover that ugly truth.

  3. Well, there are exceptions, like Dutch domestic, but the point is that nobody in his or her right mind would consider a relinquishing mother as a customer. Really, do you have the feeling that you “bought” anything?

    • But is adoption *really* buying happiness for the adoptee? Perhaps in cases of abuse, neglect, or abondonment. But what of cases such as mine – a perfectly cabable and competent woman who was convinced that her single-ness would destroy her daughter? Did adoption buy her happiness or did it buy her trips to Disneyland, dance lessons, and a car when she turned 16?

      I guess if that is what people consider happiness, then it did buy her happiness.

      M.

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